Category: Domainer

How to Contact the Owner of a Domain with WHOIS and Website Contacts Products

How to Contact the Owner of a Domain with WHOIS and Website Contacts Products

The Internet is one giant marketplace. If you are looking for a software-as-a-service (SaaS) option that you can use for your department, a simple Google search will give you dozens of them. Meanwhile, if you need someone to promote your business, the Internet can suggest several influencers depending on your niche. Once you find a company or person that matches your requirements, all of you have to do next is to contact the domain owner or website representative(s).

Contacting them may be easy since chatbots or contact forms are always available. But how can you connect with the owners of hundreds or thousands of domains without going through a chatbot or waiting for someone to answer the customer service line in each and every case? To help you, we explored four different ways to contact the owner of a domain.

WHOIS Lookups & Enterprise Cybersecurity Policies: A Secure Way to Search for Domain Names

WHOIS Lookups & Enterprise Cybersecurity Policies: A Secure Way to Search for Domain Names

These days, it’s unwise to assume that all websites are safe to access. For this reason, security teams typically advise employees against clicking on any links embedded in an email, especially from an unknown sender. This recommendation may even extend to suspicious search results that appear in search engines.

What’s more, for most companies, visiting websites that are not related to an employee’s work is a violation of established cybersecurity policies and procedures. Most cybersecurity policies include:

  • Standard steps for accessing work data and applications remotely
  • Rules for encrypting emails
  • Instructions on creating and managing passwords
  • Rules on using social media
  • Guidelines for accessing nonwork-related websites

While this last policy may sound extreme to some, it has become common practice, especially among companies that want to beef up their cybersecurity posture. Their stance is ‘Prevention is better than cure’. And keeping employees from visiting potentially dangerous websites is always safer and more cost-effective than dealing with a ransomware attack or data breach.

Given this policy, though, how can one search for domain names that might help the business gain more customers? In parallel, how can security operation centers (SOCs) investigate suspicious online activities with domain names possibly involved in an attempt or attack? Thankfully, tools such as WHOIS Lookup enable SOCs and businesses in general to do extensive research without violating the cybersecurity policies mentioned above.

How to Conduct a Website Domain Search for Cybersecurity Purposes

WHOIS lookups are a viable way for cybersecurity professionals to analyze domains’ integrity. Though they may seem less exciting than, say, deploying some nifty pen-testing tools, WHOIS lookups remain useful as a first step in catching threat actors. 

In fact, identifiers in WHOIS records can clue investigators in on a domain’s past usage and allow them to pinpoint indicators of compromise (IoCs) residing within their networks. With WHOIS data, they can also identify domain associations and effectively map attacks that happened or could happen on their infrastructure. Read on to learn more about why conducting website domain searches is critical to your digital operations, and how WHOIS API and WHOIS Lookup can facilitate it.

WHOIS History Lookup: 3 Types of Domain Names to Avoid for the Sake of Cybersecurity

WHOIS History Lookup: 3 Types of Domain Names to Avoid for the Sake of Cybersecurity

Expanding one’s business online footprint with the right domain names should not just be left to business decision-makers, but also involve cybersecurity experts. Though old domains can bring benefits to the table, no enterprise wants to end up with those having a sinister past. WHOIS history queries via solutions such as WHOIS History Lookup, Search (from the Domain Research Suite), or API can help avoid that.

How so? Digging into a domain’s WHOIS history allows you to gather more context about its past ownership, including whether it may have belonged to threat actors at some point and should therefore require greater scrutiny.

We compiled a list of domain history no-nos that can put a strain on your ventures’ success (possibly landing your website on blacklists) or even cause harm to whoever might get into contact with them.

How to Look up a Domain’s WHOIS Record History to Bolster Cybersecurity

How to Look up a Domain’s WHOIS Record History to Bolster Cybersecurity

Data breaches could cost organizations an average of $3.92 million per incident. The average ransomware payout, on the other hand, stands at $41,198 per occurrence, with the largest payout recorded to date amounting to $1.14 million. It’s essential to be meticulous when it comes to cybersecurity as a seemingly inconsequential hole in an organization’s network could result in millions of dollars’ worth in damages.

Covering every possible attack vector is, therefore, a must for cybersecurity teams, and one attack vector that cybercriminals often use is a domain name. Ransomware, for instance, usually gets injected into a victim’s system through a phishing email that contains a link to a malicious domain. The threat could also unknowingly get dropped onto a victim’s computer when he/she visits an infected website.

Therefore, every aspect of a domain should be inspected, including its WHOIS history records. That way, no stones are left unturned, and one cybersecurity product that could prove useful in this regard is WHOIS History Lookup. This tool allows users to look into the ownership history of a given domain, even before a possible redaction of WHOIS records.

How Authorities Can Clamp Down on Cybercrime with Bulk Domain Lookups

How Authorities Can Clamp Down on Cybercrime with Bulk Domain Lookups

Nominet’s takedown of 28,937 malicious sites is a small triumph for law enforcement and other internet stakeholders. With help from authorities, the domain registry has been on a quest to purge the .uk namespace of rogue domains since 2009. Now, for the first time in five years, the total number of suspended domains has finally reflected a decline. The figure may not seem like a lot, considering that it only accounts for 0.22% of the 13 million domains registered in the U.K. Still, it was a milestone for an industry fraught with prolific bad actors. In the U.K. alone, an average of 800 cyber attacks per hour hit councils. This number translates into around 263 million in just half a year.

Curbing cybercrime is an essential undertaking for internet authorities, in light of new digital technologies, and the Internet’s evolving business model. Unfortunately, lack of resources at both the domain level and cybersecurity know-how, as well as legal barriers, slow down authorities in their efforts to hunt down perpetrators. This can be made easier, though, with a bulk domain lookup solution.

Bulk WHOIS API is a good example of a research tool that cyber investigators, electronic crime units, and regulatory agencies can rely on to faster inspect a significant volume of domains. With an IP address, email address, or domain name, users can obtain pertinent registrant information for a group of web addresses. Let’s take a closer look at how users can get more out of the solution.

Integrating a Newly Registered Domains Database into Enterprise Cybersecurity Strategies

Integrating a Newly Registered Domains Database into Enterprise Cybersecurity Strategies

It’s generally agreed that newly registered domains are potential sources of threats. After all, many of these domain registrations are made opportunistically—sometimes even in bulk, following public announcements and global events. While not all of these domains have to be avoided at all costs, they certainly deserve more scrutiny than others that have been established for years.

The good news is that monitoring newly registered domains is doable with the help of the Newly Registered & Just Expired Domains Database.

How a Domain Checker Helps in Digital Forensics and Incident Response

How a Domain Checker Helps in Digital Forensics and Incident Response

Digital forensics and incident response (DFIR) experts have a unique yet essential role in maintaining the overall cybersecurity of any organization. They are responsible for gathering data about ongoing attacks or attempts, mitigating their possible effects, and implementing post-attack actions. That includes digging deeper to obtain evidence to enhance their cyber defense as well as aiding in law enforcement efforts.

The fact that attacks are getting stealthier and more sophisticated, though, in terms of tools, tactics, and procedures (TTPs) make DFIR experts’ jobs ever more difficult. They must not only resolve issues in as little time as possible but also be there to prevent successful attacks from causing irreparable damage to systems or their companies’ reputations.

Timely detection is, therefore, the answer. Then again, DFIR experts get bombarded by numerous notifications from security tools every day and thus can get easily overwhelmed by false positives. So they need solutions that can help them quickly verify the validity and quality of domains, IP addresses, and email addresses that their users come in contact with. Domain search solutions such as WHOIS Lookup and its API version WHOIS API may just be what they are looking for. Let’s discuss the reasons why.